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Margaret Atwood Studies, Volume 10 is live!

Hello, Atwoodians!
The newest volume of MAS is up!
 
To see the table of contents and abstracts for the new issue (and past issues), please visit this page:

http://atwoodsociety.org/issue-10-toc-masj/

To read the new issue, you must log into the Margaret Atwood Society site at this URL:

http://atwoodsociety.org/atwood-society-journal/

Once you are logged in, a “Click here to access journal” button will appear. If the button does not appear, your membership may have expired. You may renew your membership at this address:

http://atwoodsociety.org/membership-renewal-form-2/ 

If you have previously registered at the MAS site and created a login (whether or not you are a current member of the Society), and you do not remember your password or username, you may recover (or reset) your password or username at this link (you will need to supply your email address):

http://atwoodsociety.org/wp-login.php?action=lostpassword

Seeking Reviewers for Hagseed and Catbird Vol 1

Hi, all! Karma here–editor of the journal. I’d like to include some very brief reviews of Atwood’s last two projects (Catbird Vol. 1 and Hagseed) in our issue coming out next month. Anyone up for writing one? Send me a message: kjwaltonen@ucdavis.edu.

Call for Papers: MAS Special Issue on Ageism and Aging

Margaret Atwood Studies invites submissions of articles that focus on ageism and aging in Atwood’s works or in the works of both Atwood and other authors, such as Doris Lessing, another prolific and influential woman writer who examines these themes. This special issue aims to explore the ways these writers present the passing of time in relation to life experiences and self-consciousness. Articles might discuss the works’ depictions of what it means to come of age, how age and the aging process change how we see ourselves, when and how one becomes old, ways that gender affects the aging process, and how age discrimination shapes societies and individuals.
UPDATED: Submissions due 1 December 2016.

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